Always Another Chance!  

 

                             - Top Tips For Parents


            Issue #4    October 20, 2005

Always Another Chance! is published by Frank McGinty for opt-in subscribers only.



In This Edition

1. Editorial:
2. Feature Article: Think Like Your Kids - And Understand Them More
3. Laugh It Off!
4. Think About It!
5. General & Unsubscribe Info



1. Editorial

Greetings,

I'm delighted to say the number of our readers continues to
grow, and it's interesting to see the wide range of
countries you all come from.

Judging by names and places of  residence, it could be that
English is not the first language of some of you.

In that case I hope you don't have any difficulty with my
'Scottish' brand of English, but let me know if you ever do!

This edition is slightly later than planned.  That's because
I've had a hectic time over the past few weeks.

I've been giving a number of talks, preparing for our trip
to the States, and to cap it all some of the teachers at
Notre Dame (the school where I do supply work) have been
laid low by a virus.

This is highly unusual at this time of year, and I was
called in to help out with the staff shortage.

Still, the school is getting back to normal now, leaving me
free to go off to America.

Speaking of which, our trip to New Orleans (mentioned in
the last issue) is definitely off.  We feared that Hurricane
Rita might spoil our trip to Texas entirely, but the word from
Austin is that there's blue skies and temperatures up to
107F.

If we ever got temperatures like that over here no one would
want to work, especially the school kids.  We'd all want to
be out sunbathing!

I'm interested to see how the Texas students cope with all
that sunshine, and I'm looking forward to visiting some
schools.  I'll keep you posted!

Since so many new readers have subscribed recently, I've
decided to post the back issues of 'Always Another Chance!'
on my website.  This will let you to catch up on the
articles you've missed.

I'll make that a priority on my return from the States.

In the meantime, I hope you'll find the article below
useful.

Many of the problems I've encountered between parents and
children have been based on an inability to see things from
the other's point of view.

It always helps our parenting skills if we take the lead in
the vital area of  communication.

My very best wishes!

Frank
http://www.frank-mcginty.com/for-parents.html



2. Feature Article

Think Like Your Kids - And Understand Them More

(c) Frank McGinty  All Rights Reserved



Seven-year old Michael was on a school trip to a Wildlife
Centre in Central Scotland. It was near the end of the day
and they were in the Gift Shop before boarding the bus for
the journey home.

Poor Michael! He couldn't resist the array of lollipops and
chocolate animals that beckoned to him. He chose one and was
about to pay for it with his last few pennies.

His teacher, a kindly soul with not long before retirement,
noticed him. "Have you bought something for your Mum yet,
Michael?"

Michael lowered his head in shame! Gently, the teacher took
the candy bar from him and replaced it on the shelf.

She walked to another display and selected a small figure
made from cheap plastic. "Why not take this for her? You've
got just enough money left."

Years have now passed.

Michael is all grown up and has left home, but the
figurine still has pride of place in his mum's display
cabinet.

Michael still recalls the day he learned an important
lesson about parental love: "The figure was made of cheap
plastic, but my Mum couldn't have treasured it more had
it been made of silver, gold or even platinum."

Sometimes we as parents and adults lose our sense of
perspective, don't we? What may seem trivial and
unimportant to us, can mean so much to a child.

We can learn a useful parenting tip from Michael's mum.
The gift had little or no monetary value, but was given
- albeit with a gentle nudge from the teacher! - with
generosity and a certain amount of personal sacrifice.
And by displaying it for years, Michael's mum showed her
appreciation of that.

This reminds me of a conference I once attended.

There was a blue rug on the floor and the participants were
asked to gather round. It was an exercise in perception,
we were told.

The speaker threw a small woollen ball onto the rug.
It was exactly the same colour and was made from the same
material - so it blended in and seemed to disappear.

'Now find it,' was the instruction. Everyone peered and
peered without success, until someone - not me! - got down
on his knees and looked from ground level.

Bingo! There was the profile of the ball, rising above the
surface of the mat.

Call it 'thinking outside the box' or whatever - but very
often problems can be solved by looking at them from another
perspective or dimension.

When we learn to think like our children, when we 'get
down to their level', when we master the art of getting
inside their heads and seeing life from their point of view,
the task of raising children becomes much easier - to say
nothing of more enjoyable and fulfilling.

Happy parenting!



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3. Laugh It Off!

Throughout the centuries, mothers have given their children
plenty of good advice and notable quotes. Here's just a
small sample:

MARY, MARY, QUITE CONTRARY'S MOTHER: "I don't mind you
having a garden, Mary, but does it have to be growing under
your bed?"

MONA LISA'S MOTHER: "After all that money your father and I
spent on braces, Mona, is that the biggest smile you can
give us?"

HUMPTY DUMPTY'S MOTHER: "Humpty, If I've told you once, I've
told you a hundred times not to sit on that wall. But would you
listen to me? Noooo!"

COLUMBUS'S MOTHER: "I don't care what you've discovered,
Christopher. You still could have written!"

MICHELANGELO'S MOTHER: "Mike, can't you paint on walls like
other children? Do you have any idea how hard it is to get
that stuff off the ceiling?"

NAPOLEON'S MOTHER: "All right, Napoleon. If you aren't
hiding your report card inside your jacket, then take your
hand out of there and prove it!"




4. Think About It!

Children are likely to live up to what you believe of them.
--- Lady Bird Johnson, 1912



5. General & Unsubscribe Info

Always Another Chance! - Top Tips For Parents
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